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Here in This Moment

This past week I was cleaning out my inbox of seven years' worth of emails. A lot accumulates in that span of time. I realized that all the problems and worries I had thought were so insurmountable had been handled...every single one. All those bills I had to pay, calls I had to make, opinions that I had held so stubbornly to...none of them mattered anymore. All the relationships and conversations I had lost sleep over--I had forgotten about all of them. People had come and gone from my life, some had passed away into eternity.  I'm saddened at how much has changed in seven years. I wonder how life would have been different if I hadn't worried so much about everything.

But one thing I don't regret is that I lived each of the moments over the past seven years to the fullest. I don't regret the time I spent staying up with a friend, or giving someone a meal or a gift, or opening up my home to a person that needed it. Even when friendships didn't pan out like I expected them to, or when people let me down or took advantage of me, or when promotions passed me over to someone less qualified, I was able to sleep at night knowing I had lived my life to the best of my ability. I had done right by everyone and I had nothing to be ashamed of.

This was a lesson I had learned while still in college, from a wise professor who had been cultivating this in his own life. These are just some of the things he taught us:

Be fully present in the moment. Embrace every situation life gives you. Even in sorrow there is much to be learned. Listen intently to each conversation you're in. Don't try to multi-task. Do one thing fully until it is done.

The only things that matter in life are people and God. These are eternal and essential. Everything else eventually fades.

Stand before God for men before you stand before men for God. The most effective way to serve and honor people is to do it from a place where we first serve and honor God.

Love your neighbor as you love yourself. "I don't want to be loved the way some of you love yourselves," he would say. And he was right. The only way to truly love is to know how fully we are loved by the Lord. Otherwise we hurt or push away everyone we meet. 

Write. Always keep a notebook on you to record your thoughts, ideas, lessons, or Scripture. Memories fade, but what's written down endures and has a way of reminding us how far we have come. 

These precious lessons have stayed with me for the last 12 years. I am so thankful for them. They have become even more important since getting married and having a child. There is more vying for my attention now than ever in my life. But in the craziest moments I can remember these words and come back to what is truly important. 

Comments

Stephanie M said…
Your loving positivity is the best!

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